Tag Archives: word-sense disambiguation

Leaving ambiguity unresolved

Disambiguation is an essential process in machine translation. Sometimes, however, it seems more rational and logical to leave an ambiguity in the translation. This is the case when (i) there is an ambiguous word in the sentence to be translated; … Continue reading

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Grammatical word-disambiguation again

The challenge is especially that of generalizing the grammatical word-disambiguation to several languages. Creating a module of grammatical word-disambiguation for each language appears to be a long and arduous task. This seems to be the main difficulty. But if a … Continue reading

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Hinting at the Control problem

The question of choosing the best system to solve the problems posed by word disambiguation in the field of translation seems to be linked to the AGI control problem (how to avoid that an AGI finally turns out to be … Continue reading

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On the implementation of grammatical disambiguation

Grammatical disambiguation – i.e. whether ‘maintenant’ is and adverb (now) or the gerundive (maintaining) of the verb ‘maintenir’ – seems to be the crucial issue for the adoption of the rule-based model or statistical model for machine translation. This problem … Continue reading

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Performing our first open test of the year

Let us comment on the remaining errors encountered in the above open test: French ‘carrière’ remains undisambiguated: either carriera (career) or cava (quarry): two occurrences ‘de’: French ‘de’ is perhaps the most difficult word to translate into another language, due … Continue reading

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Word sense disambiguation: a hard case

Let us consider a hard case for word sense disambiguation, in the context of French to Corsican MT. But the same goes for French to English MT. It relates to French words such as: ‘accomplit’, ‘affaiblit’, ‘affranchit’, ‘alourdit’, ‘amortit’. The … Continue reading

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More on grammatical type disambiguation

Let us focus on grammatical type disambiguation, which is a subproblem of word disambiguation. General grammatical types are: verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, gerundive, etc. But for grammatical type disambiguation purposes, more accuracy is in order: instances of grammatical types … Continue reading

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New insight on the issue of pair reversal (updated)

The issue of pair reversal: it goes as follows: Suppose your have a given translation pair A>B that translates language A into language B, how hard is it to build the reverse pair B>A? Now the current instance of this … Continue reading

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What is required from Artificial General Intelligence with regard to Machine Translation?

We will be interested in a series of posts to try to define what is required of an AGI (Artificial General Intelligence) in order to reach the level of superintelligence in MT (machine translation). (All this is highly speculative, but … Continue reading

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Superintelligent machine translation (updated)

Let us consider superintelligence with regard to machine translation. To fix ideas, we can propose a rough definition: it consists of a machine with the ability to translate with 99% (or above) accuracy from one of the 8000 languages to … Continue reading

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